ACE Publications and Resources

In support of our mission, ACE has actively engaged in scholarly activities and publications to help our member organizations. Lists of different resources and publications sponsored by ACE are available below.

The Alliance for Clinical Education has published several books. We continue to work on new editions of The Guidebook for Clerkship Directors.  The organization is interested in collaborating with others on topics that are related to our mission of providing excellent clinical medical education.

Guidebook for Clerkship Directors, 5th Edition

Bruce Z. Morgenstern M.D. (Sr Ed).  Horak H, Konopasek L, Ledford C, Manthey D, Olasky J, Power DV, Pradhan A, Vaidya N, Beck Dallaghan GL. (eds), Alliance for Clinical Education Guidebook for Clerkship Directors, 5th Edition.  North Syracuse, NY: Gegensatz Press, 2019.

Available From
Gegensatz Press ($59.95)

Summary
This 5th edition of the Guidebook for Clerkship Directors represents the collaborative effort of the eight member organizations of the Alliance for Clinical Education and reflects the knowledge and experience of its many authors, all of whom are devoted to medical student education. The Guidebook offers both new and experienced medical school clinical medical student educators high-level and often detailed information and guidance on the best ways to organize a clerkship, develop and evaluate a curriculum, implement that curriculum and evaluate the students’ performances within those curricula. Others interested in or already involved in undergraduate medical education will also benefit from the book’s content, with its focus on professional development and personal career development.

In addition to updating the materials in chapters carried over from the 4th edition, this edition adds chapters on teaching lifelong learning, student wellness, interprofessional education, health systems science, medical ethics, medical students and the law, and a chapter detailing clinical skills training to be taught before students hit the clerkships.  The chapters have been streamlined to make this a true handbook for just in time reading on specific topics.

Book Review:  Teaching and Learning in Medicine

Previous Editions

  • Fincher RM, ed. Guidebook for Clerkship Directors. Washington DC: AAMC Press, 1995.
  • Fincher RM, ed. Guidebook for Clerkship Directors, 2nd Edition. Washington DC: AAMC Press, 2000.
  • Fincher RM, ed. Guidebook for Clerkship Directors, 3rd Edition. Alliance for Clinical Education, 2005.
  • Morgenstern BZ, ed. Guidebook for Clerkship Directors, 4th Edition. Syracuse, NY: Gegensatz Press, 2012.

Mind the Gap: Generational Differences in Medical Education

Geoffrey A. Talmon, M.D. and Gary L. Beck Dallaghan, Ph.D., eds.  Mind the Gap: Generational Differences in Medical Education.  Syracuse, NY: Gegensatz Press, 2017.

Available From
Buy Now: $29.95

Summary
The inspiration for this book came from a series of conversations with mid-career faculty at an educational meeting.  For the first time in human history there are four to five generations interacting regularly in society and the workplace.  Sociologists and popular culture have given these groups names: Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials, and Generation Z.  While intergenerational differences have been ever present in our history, the likelihood that someone may be interacting with, working with, or supervising an individual three generations distant from theirs is becoming more commonplace.  The book is intended to be practical with ideas that are immediately applicable.  Our goal for this book is raise awareness of how generational issues impact medical education and provide medical educators, trainees, supervisors, and employers with an understanding of how the newer generations learn, work, interact with patients, and will potentially lead.

 

Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships: Principles, Outcomes, Practical Tools, and Future Directions

Ann Poncelet, M.D. and David Hirsh, M.D., eds.  Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships: Principles, Outcomes, Practical Tools, and Future Directions.  Syracuse, NY: Gegensatz Press, 2016.

Available From
Amazon: $39.95

Google Play: $17.95

Summary
It is a pleasure for ACE to see this book in publication. Dr. Poncelet and Dr. Hirsh eagerly developed an encyclopedic chapter for the 4th edition of the Guidebook for Clerkship Directors, and it seemed logical and proper to grow that chapter, which had been truncated for the Guidebook, into this useful handbook.  They have assembled the leading international experts in the field of medical school longitudinal integrated curriculum, who in turn have generated what we are sure will be considered the ultimate resource for these experiences. This book fills a significant void in the medical education literature.

 

Figures in Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships: Principles, Outcomes, Practical Tools, and Future Directions 

  • Chapter 1 refers to a two-model figure for LICs. The image may be found here {LIC_TwoModelFigure}.
  • Chapter 29 refers to a figure detailing accreditation. The image may be found here {Accreditation}.

The Handbook on Medical Student Evaluation and Assessment

Pangaro L, McGaghie W, eds. Handbook on Medical Student Evaluation and Assessment. Syracuse, NY: Gegensatz Press, 2015.

Available From
Amazon (paperback): $39.95
Google Play: $9.99

Summary
This comprehensive book derives from some chapters in the indispensable fourth edition of theGuidebook for Clerkship Directors, but expands upon those chapters and contains critical new information about milestones, professionalism, and program evaluation.

It is useful not only for clerkship directors, but also for pre-clinical educators, teachers of electives and subinternships, the dean’s office, the student affairs office, residency and fellowship program directors, and anyone who teaches, advises, or mentors medical students. It discusses all aspects of assessing learners, with well-referenced presentations starting from basic definitions, progressing through various assessment methods, and including reviews of the legal aspects of assessments.

There are numerous issues common to all clerkships.  In order to effect change, ACE has promoted collaborative studies to further its mission. Our Research Committee is always interested in hearing from individuals interested in pursuing multi-institutional projects that have an impact on clinical medical education.

Brodkey AC, Sierles FS, Spertus IL, Weiner CL, McCurdy FA.  Clerkship Directors’ perceptions of the effects of managed care on medical students’ education.  Acad Med 2002; 77:1112-1120.

Pangaro L, Fincher RM, Bachicha J, Gelb D, Brodkey A, Morgenstern B, Chumley-Jones H, Sachdeva AK. Expectations of and for Clerkship Directors: A collaborative statement from the Alliance for Clinical Education. Teach Learn Med 2003; 15(3):217-222.

Sierles FS, Brodkey AC, Cleary LM, McCurdy FA, Mintz M, Frank J, Lynn DJ, Chao J, Morgenstern BZ, Shore W, Woodard JL. Medical Students’ Exposure To and Attitudes about Drug Company Interactions: A National Survey. JAMA 2005; 294(9): 1034-1042.

Ephgrave K, Margo KL, White C, Hammoud Maya, Brodkey A, Painter T, Juel VC, Shaw D, Ferguson K. Core clerkship directors: Their current resources and the rewards of the role. Acad Med 2010; 85(4):710-715.

Hammoud MM, Margo K, Christner JG, Fisher J, Fischer SH, Pangaro LN. Opportunities and challenges in integrating electronic health records into undergraduate medical education: A national survey of clerkship directors. Teach Learn Med 2012; 24(3):219-224.

 Hammoud MM, Dalrymple JL, Christner JG, Stewart RA, Fisher J, Margo K, Ali II, Briscoe GW, Pangaro LN. Medical student documentation in electronic health records: A collaborative statement from the Alliance for Clinical Education. Teach Learn Med 2012; 24(3):257-266.

 Reddy ST, Chao J, Carter JL, Drucker R, Katz NT, Nesbit R, Roman B, Wallenstein J, Beck GL. Alliance for Clinical Education Perspective Paper: Recommendations for Redesigning the “Final Year” of Medical School. Teach Learn Med 2014; 26(4):420-427.

Christner JG, Beck Dallaghan G, Briscoe G, Casey P, Fincher RE, Manfred LM, Margo KI, Muscarella P, Richardson JE, Safdieh J, Steiner BD. The community preceptor crisis: Recruiting and retaining community-based faculty to teach medical students – A shared perspective from the Alliance for Clinical Education. Teach Learn Med 2016; 28(3):329-336.

Christner JG, Beck Dallaghan G, Briscoe G, Graziano S, Mylona E, Wood S, Power DV.  To Pay or Not to Pay Community Preceptors? That is a Question… Teach Learn Med 2019; 31(3):279-287.

Beck Dallaghan GL, Ledford CH, Ander D, Spollen J, Smith S, Graziano S, Cox SM. Evolving Roles of Clerkship Directors: Have Expectations Changed? Med Ed Online 2020; 25:1, 1714201, DOI:10.1080/10872981.2020.1714201 .

ACE conducts panel presentations at the Association of American Medical Colleges annual meetings.  The topics and corresponding slide presentations are posted here for individuals to access.  If you have questions about any of these presentations, please email the Executive Director at alliance4clined@gmail.com.

2019: Testing Drives Curriculum, But Does It Drive Anxiety?

“Assessment drives learning” is a frequently heard comment from medical educators, and indeed is helpful for learning, but how much is too much? With increasing rates of anxiety in college populations and then ultimately medical student populations, does the focus on assessment in medical school ultimately contribute to the high burnout rates seen in residency and in the practicing physician?  These questions and more were explored during this session.  The objectives of the session were to:
-Identify the main sources of anxiety students have regarding assessments;
-List the attributes of millennial and Generation Z students that might further contribute to their anxiety; and
-Identify ways to mitigate this anxiety in the culture of assessment.

 

 

 

 

2018: Direct Observation and EPAs: The Critical Role of the Preceptor

Due to the AAMC Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency, institutions are investigating innovative assessment tools for the clinical learning environments. Challenges include insufficient direct observation opportunities, how to “confer” entrustability, how to ensure continued growth after students reach EPAs, and how to ensure clinical preceptors implement the conceptual framework of EPAs. This interactive session of the Alliance for Clinical Education addressed challenges with solutions as well as brainstorm other practical applications. The objectives of the session were to:
-List the EPAs that are amenable to direct observation depending upon the clerkship specialty;
-Describe challenges related to implanting EPAs into the clinical curriculum; and
-Implement solutions related to above challenges at their home institutions including describing helpful precepting strategies that support direct observation.

2017: Interprofessional Education: The Quest to Meet and Exceed the Accreditation Requirements

Interprofessional education (IPE) is important because healthcare workers must continuously strive to reduce errors that impact patients. IPE may be an opportunity to prevent their occurrence. During this session, we will co-create a SWOT analysis to develop an IPE curriculum, discuss implementation of IPE curriculum, and overcome common obstacles.

 

2016: What Are the Responsibilities of the Clerkship Director and for Whom Does He/She Work?

Since the Alliance for Clinical Education’s collaborative statement on the expectations of clerkship directors, clerkship formats have evolved. As a result, so must the expectations of the clerkship director.  The objectives of this session were to:
-Identify and prioritize the job responsibilities of the clerkship director
-Outline the essential skills needed to succeed in those responsibilities, and;
-Identify the individual(s) to whom he/she might report
The results of this panel were published in Medical Education Online.

2014:  Medical Student Mistreatment

The mistreatment of medical students by faculty, residents and others is of increasing concern among medical educators. Much of that abuse is reported to occur on clinical clerkships. The members of this panel will discuss the definition of student mistreatment, the extent of the problem, and possible ways to manage and prevent it. Members of the audience will also be asked to describe ways in which they have successfully dealt with the problem. Attendees of the panel session should be able to:
-Identify what constitutes mistreatment of medical students.
-Describe the extent of the problem of medical student abuse.
-Discuss proposed ways of stopping medical student abuse – and the success of such attempts.

2012: Defining Milestones for Undergraduate Medical Education

Medical schools are embracing competency-based education and educators are talking about how to define milestones for undergraduate medical education (UGME). The work to define milestones at the UGME level must be accomplished across rather than within specialty disciplines, and across medical schools rather than within each school. This is an ideal time for medical educators to collaborate to define core UGME competencies and to develop milestones for medical student education. The Alliance for Clinical Education sponsors this panel presentation to bring those working in this arena together to discuss their recent efforts and to help set a vision for the important next steps; therefore, the target audience for this presentation is medical education deans, course and clerkship directors and faculty, members of curriculum committees.

2010: New Directions for “Clerkship” Education: Lessons from Three Schools

Clinical medical student education has traditionally centered on departmentally based experiences in core disciplines. In the past 10 years, alternative models have emerged, with longitudinal integrated experiences for medical students. Is one better than the other? Is there evidence to support one experience as educationally superior than another? What can we learn from new models to enhance traditional models?

2008: National Survey of Clerkship Director Demographics, Resources, and Professional Life

After publishing Expectations of and for Clerkship Directors: A Collaborative Statement from the Alliance for Clinical Education (Teaching & Learning in Medicine, 2003, 15:217), a national survey was conducted of clerkship directors in an attempt to validate the expectations for clerkship directors. With more additions to medical school curricula coupled with increasing patient care demands, efforts of clerkship directors may be stymied by forces beyond their control. The findings indicate clerkship directors are doing the best they can, but they are still not able to achieve what the expectations have laid out.

2006: Implementing Longitudinal Themes in Clinical Medical Education

The goal of this workshop is to discuss the challenges clerkship directors face regarding the responsibility of meeting the long-term objectives of our individual institutions (i.e., the longitudinal themes) while also meeting the objectives specific to our individual disciplines. The session will begin with a general introduction with respect to concepts like professionalism, communication skills, interprofessional collaboration, life-long learning, etc. during the clinical years. Next, each panel presenter will discuss their national clerkship organization’s recommendations and resources. In addition, each presenter will discuss some strategies currently in use at their own institution. The session will end with questions and comments from the audience.

2018: Pass-Fail in Medical School and the Residency Application Process and GME Transition

With the continued move to adopt a competency based medical education mindset in undergraduate medical education, coupled with concerns about student burnout, more medical schools are moving toward a Pass-Fail standard for grading.  While such a standard has an appeal for a competency based program (i.e., one either meets a standard or does not), it meets up against the hard reality of the competitive residency application process.  Residency, and fellowship, program directors are often faced with a large number of applications and either relatively limited information, or information such as the Medical Student Performance Evaluation that they may not fully trust.  Faced with a need to rank applicants, program directors are left with emphasizing those elements of performance that are more easily measured—scores on licensing and other examinations, even if they recognize the limitations in such information. The objectives of this session were to:
-Recognize the current trends in grading in UME and the challenges this may present in the residency application process;
Describe approaches to enhancing the quality of information gathered and reported in UME; and
Describe at least one method to enhance the residency review and/or selection process for medical students who come from programs that do not use traditional grades.

2018:  Are Red Flags Incompatible with a Successful Match?

ACE prepared a poster presentation for the meeting.  We were able to have discussions with participants at the reception as well as capture survey data as part of the poster.

The poster is available to review by clicking here.

 

 

 

2016:  Cultural Barriers to Effective Learning

Participants in this session will identify and discuss strategies to address cultural barriers impacting the learning environment. As individuals transition into professional programs, the expectations is that they make the leap to being an adult learners. This is an important theoretical construct that may be unknown to learners from different cultures as well as the millennial generation.  The objectives of this session were to:
-Discuss cultural barriers that may exist in various learning environments;
-Identify how adult learning theory can be applied to cultural differences; and
-Devise methods of enhancing the learning environment to be more culturally inclusive.

2015: Transition to Residency: Who’s Responsible?

The transition from medical school to residency training has come under scrutiny.  There is a push for competency-based medical education, but few medical educators have frameworks that are easily understood by clinical educators as well as trainees.  This session addressed the efforts to develop milestones and competencies that could be applied in medical student education.

 

 

2013: Evaluation and Grading in Clerkships: Current State and Future Directions

For its plenary session at the AAMC meeting, the Alliance for Clinical Education explored the possibility of inter-school standards for evaluating students. In principle, common standards of assessment across schools could make it easier for residency directors to select among candidates for their GME programs, and create less reliance on things like USMLE scores. Viewpoints on this question were presented in a “pro” and “con” fashion with ample time for discussion among the attendees at the session.

 

2011: Who Cares About the 4th Year of Medical School?

The fourth year of medical school has long been discussed as an area where curricular renewal is needed. Some argue in favor of leaving it as an open time for students to select any courses they want, while others believe that there should be a more structured curriculum. Efforts are also being made by some disciplines to formalize at least parts of the pre-residency training (such as the subinternships) and to recommend specific courses in the senior year for students going into their specialties.

 

2009: Integrating Electronic Health Records into Undergraduate Medical Education: Challenges and Opportunities

Electronic Health Records (EHR) are powerful tools for optimizing patient care delivery, and many academic centers are incorporating EHR into teaching settings. However, there have been relatively few studies reporting the effect of EHR on the education of medical students, and the optimal integration of EHR into undergraduate medical education has not been well described or documented. As a result, a national survey was conducted of clerkship directors in an attempt to better understand the challenges and opportunities of integrating EHR into daily teaching of medical students.

2007: Portfolios in Clinical Medical Education –One Method to Foster Inter-clerkship Growth

Student portfolios are becoming increasingly common in undergraduate medical education. The literature reveals that portfolios are used for many different purposes including stimulating reflection and tracking development of competencies. Portfolios range from small endeavors, designed by a single discipline for a very specific purpose to major undertakings, backed by institutional resources. Several institutions are incorporating patient encounter logs into a portfolio. Many portfolios are multi-disciplinary, allowing the opportunity for collaboration among specialties.

2005: Evaluation and Feedback During Clerkships: Solutions from the National Clerkship Organizations

The goal of this workshop was to present a spectrum of perspectives on evaluation and feedback of medical students across the third-year core clerkships. The session provided general background information including the LCME standards for evaluation and feedback. Next, each panel presenter discussed their national clerkship organization recommendations and resources. In addition, each presenter discussed some strategies currently in use at their own institution. The session ended with a discussion on legal issues involved in evaluation and feedback, followed by questions and comments from the audience.

Proceedings of ACE Member Meetings

In conjunction with Teaching and Learning in Medicine, ACE member organizations select abstracts from their meetings. Our Publications Committee is responsible for this process.

Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry

  Brodkey AC.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2001 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.  Teach Learn Med 2003; 15(1):65-69.

  Cutler JL, Gay T.  ACE PROCEEDINGS: Proceedings of the 2002 and 2003 Annual Meetings of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry. Teach Learn Med 2004; 16(4):388-396.

  Vaidya N.  Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.  Teach Learn Med 2005; 17(4):396-400.

  Leamon MH.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.  Teach Learn Med 2006; 18(2):177-182.

  Levine RE.  Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.  Teach Learn Med 2007; 19(2):202-209.

  Roman B. Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry. Teach Learn Med 2008; 20(2):197-200.

  Roman B, Briscoe G. Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.  Teach Learn Med 2009; 21(2):166-171.

  Briscoe G, Roman B.  Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.  Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(2):156-163.

  Briscoe G, Spollen J. Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.  Teach Learn Med 2011; 23(1):96-102.

Association for Surgical Education

  Lynch TG. ACE ABSTRACTS: Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2005; 17(3):297-303.

  Lynch TG. ACE ABSTRACTS: Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meetings of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2006; 18(1):69-76.

  Lynch TG.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meetings of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2007; 19(1):75-82.

  Schenarts PJ. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2008; 20(1):92-97.

  Schenarts PJ. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2008; 20(4):352-356.

  Schenarts PJ. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meetings of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(1):68-73.

  Steinemann S. Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(4):337-342.

  Steinemann S. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education. Teach Learn Med 2011; 23(4):374-380.

  Steinemann S. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education.  Teach Learn Med 2012; 24(4):370-375.

  Sudan R.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Association for Surgical Education.  Teach Learn Med 2014; 26(2): 189-195.

  Sudan R.  Association for Surgical Education: Highlights and Selected Abstracts From the 2014 Annual Meeting.  Teach Learn Med 2015; 27(1): 105-109.

Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine

  Elnicki DM.  ACE ABSTRACTS: Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine. Teach Learn Med 2005; 17(4):385-390.

  Hemmer PA. ACE ABSTRACTS: Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine. Teach Learn Med 2006; 18(2):171-176.

  Loftus TH.  Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine. Teach Learn Med 2007; 19(3):323-327.

  Masters PA. Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine. Teach Learn Med 2009; 21(1):67-71.

  Hauer KE.  Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2009; 21(3):267-272.

  De Fer TM. Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine. Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(4):327-332.

  Harrell HE, Hoellein AR. Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2012; 24(3):273-278.

  Fazio SB, Hoellein AR, Alexandraki I, Chheda SG.  Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2013; 25(4): 392-397.

  Lang VJ, Chheda SG, Kogan JR, Muntz MD, Lee WW, Battistone MJ, Hayton A, Fazio SB, Okuliar C, LaRochelle JS.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2014; 26(3): 316-321.

  Denton GD, Shaheen AW, Lee WW, Esquivel EL, Kelly W, Levine D, Muntz MD, Yepes-Rios M, LaRochelle J.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine. Teach Learn Med 2015; 27(3): 346-350.

Society for Teachers of Family Medicine

  Chumley H. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Predoctoral Meeting of the Society for Teachers of Family Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2005; 17(4): 391-395.

  Chumley H, Steele DJ. ACE ABSTRACTS: Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Predoctoral Meeting of the Society for Teachers of Family Medicine. Teach Learn Med 2006; 18(4):356-361.

  Little DN, Hatch RL.  Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Predoctoral Education Conference of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2008; 20(4):346-351.

  Little DN, Hatch RL.  Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Predoctoral Education Conference of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(1):60-67.

  Little DN, Hatch RL.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Predoctoral Education Conference of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.  Teach Learn Med 2011; 23(1):90-95.

  Mendoza MD, Little DN.  Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2011 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Conference on Medical Student Education.  Teach Learn Med 2012; 24(1):90-96.

  Mendoza M. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the 2012 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Conference on Medical Student Education.  Teach Learn Med 2013; 25(1):109-114.

  Robinson M, Mendoza MD.  Proceedings of the 2013 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Conference on Medical Student Education.  Teach Learn Med 2014; 26(2): 196-203.

  Robinson M, Mendoza MD.  Abstracts From the Proceedings of the 2014 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Conference on Medical Student Education.  Teach Learn Med 2015; 27(2): 226-232.

In conjunction with Teaching and Learning in Medicine, ACE member organizations select abstracts from their meetings.  Our Publications Committee is responsible for this process.

  Kogan JR. Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals.  Teach Learn Med 2005; 17(3): 307-311.

 Margo K, Chumley H. Review of Medical Education Articles in Family Medicine Journals. Teach Learn Med 2006; 18(1):82-86.

  Durning SJ, Dyrbye LN, Mechaber AJ, Thomas MR, Fischer M, O’Brien K, Baker EA, Battistone MJ, Mintz M, Torre D, Hoellein AR. Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals 2006–2007. Teach Learn Med 2009; 21(1):72-75.

  Margo K. Review of Medical Education Articles in Family Medicine 2006–2007. Teach Learn Med 2009; 21(3):273-276.

  Lynn J, Ali I, Isaacson RS, Newman-Toker DE. Review of Medical Education Articles in Neurology 2007–2008. Teach Learn Med 2009; 21(4):351-354.

  Carter WG. Review of Medical Education Articles in Psychiatry 2007–2008. Teach Learn Med 2009; 21(4):355-359.

  Torre DM, Hoellein AR, O’Brien K, Chheda SG, Dyrbye LN, Baker EA, Mechaber AJ, Fischer MA, Thomas MR, Durnging SJ. Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals, 2007–08. Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(1):74-77.

  Lin M, Khandelwal S. Review of Medical Education Articles from Emergency Medicine Journals 2008. Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(1):78-80.

  Dyrbye LN, Hoellein AR, Baker EA, Mechaber AJ, O’Brien K, Thomas MR, Alexandraki I, Chretien KC, Shaheen A, Engle K, Palacio C, Torre D, Chheda SG, Pokala S. Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals, 2008–2009. Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(3):233-236.

  Steiner B, Wiseman P. Review of Medical Education Articles in Family Medicine, 2008–2009. Teach Learn Med 2010; 22(4):333-336.

  Carter WG. Review of Medical Education Articles in Psychiatry 2009–2010. Teach Learn Med 2011; 23(4):365-368.

  Hoellein AR, Shaheen A, Alexandraki I, Chheda SG, Chretien K, Pokala S, Szauter K, Durning SJ, Palacio C, Torre DM, LaRochelle J, Mechaber AJ, Baker EA, Papp KK. Journal Watch From CDIM Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine, 2009–2010. Teach Learn Med 2011; 23(4):369-373.

  Chretien KC, Alexandraki I, Szauter K, Shaheen A, Chheda SG, Hoellein AR, Levine DL, Fagan MJ, Pokala S, Palacio C, Perroy A, Torre DM. Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals, 2010–2011. Teach Learn Med 2012; 24(3):279-283.

  Dalrymple JL, Casey PM, Chuang A, Katz NT. Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2010–2011. Teach Learn Med 2012; 24(4):365-369.

  Ko PY, Bernard AW, Poznanski SL, Cooney R, Khandelwal S, Lin M. Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Emergency Medicine, 2010–2011. Teach Learn Med 2013; 25(2):178-182.

Shaheen AW, Levine DL, Pokala S, Fagan MJ, Szauter K, Alexandraki I, Chretien K, Palacio C, Chheda SG, Hoellein AR, McManamon A, Torre DM.  Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals, 2011–2012.  Teach Learn Med 2014; 26(1): 103-108.

  Chuang A, Abbott J, Dalrymple JL, Dugoff L.  Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2012.  Teach Learn Med 2014; 26(2): 204-208.

  Alexandraki I, Pincavage AT, Glod S, Liston B, Palacio C, DeWaay D, Chheda SG, Van Wagoner NJ, LaRochelle JS, Burger AP, Shaheen A, Simmons L, Fagan MJ, Leizman DS, Wayne JT, Levine DL, Szauter K, Chretien KC.  Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals, 2012–2013.  Teach Learn Med 2014; 26(4): 438-443.

  Hampton BS, Pradhan A, Abbott J, Buery-Joyner SD, Craig LB, Forstein D, Hopkins L, Wolf A, Page-Ramsey SM.  Journal Watch from ACE (Alliance for Clinical Education): Review of Medical Education Articles in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2013-2015.  Teach Learn Med 2017; Published online.

  Walsh K, Alexandraki I, Burger AP, Chheda SG, DeWaay D, Fagan MJ, Glod SA, Leizman DS, Liston B, Packer CD, Pincavage AT, Wayne JT, Aldrich A, Szauter K. Journal Watch from ACE (Alliance for Clinical Education): Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Internal Medicine Journals, 2014-2015. Teach Learn Med 2017; Published online.